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Schedule

The following artists will perform at the National Hispanic Cultural Center for ¡Globalquerque! 2016 (Sept. 23-24). Performances will take place on three stages, all located at the NHCC (1701 4th St SW, at Avenida César Chávez). Enjoy the intimate courtyard setting of the Fountain Courtyard, the state of the art 692-seat Albuquerque Journal Theatre and dance outside on the Plaza Mayor.

Grounds open at 4 PM and performances start at 6:20 PM (Friday)/6 PM (Saturday) and run until at least 11:40 pm. The Global Village will be open into the night. There will also be FREE day programming on Saturday for families and adults, including workshops on music and folklore, crafts, and live performances. Visit the Global Fiesta page for more info.

Friday:
Anda Union (Mongolia)
Fémina (Argentina)
Herencia de Timbiquí (Colombia)
Maya Kamaty (Réunion)
Rajab Suleiman & Kithara (Zanzibar)
Germán López (Canary Islands)
Vân-Ánh Võ (Vietnam)

Saturday:
Anda Union (Mongolia)
Federspiel (Austria)
Fémina (Argentina)
Mokoomba (Zimbabwe)
Dona Onete (Brazil)
Rajab Suleiman & Kithara (Zanzibar)

And many more to be announced!

Anda Union (Mongolia)

Anda UnionAnda Union’s thoroughly addictive combination of Mongolian musical styles is a reflection of their roots. Hailing from differing ethnic nomadic cultures, the band unite tribal and music traditions from all over Inner Mongolia. Anda Union bring a wide range of musical instruments and vocal styles together in a fusion that Genghis Khan himself would have been proud of. Keenly aware of the threat to the Grasslands and their age old Mongolian culture, Anda Union are driven by their fight for the survival of this endangered way of life, by keeping the essence of the music alive.

Anda Union all trained in traditional Mongolian music from a young age, many coming from musical families. They are part of a musical movement that is finding inspiration in old and forgotten songs. As a group they hold on to the essence of Mongolian music while creating a form of music that is new. Anda Union combine different traditions and styles of Mongolian music, developing an innovation previously unheard of.

Driven by their thirst to discover the power and magic of the rich and powerful Mongol traditions and culture, they have been stunning people all over the world with their music for the last fifteen years.

Watch a video:
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Federspiel (Austria)

FederspielFederspiel is a seven-piece ensemble that redefines brass-band music. Their incredible skills meet youthful and charming freshness in playing and musical arrangements. Creativity, spontaneity and joy are high on Federspiel’s list of priorities.

In 2005, seven young musicians, all students of the University of Music and Performing Arts Vienna, joined together to form Federspiel. Folk music from Austria, neighboring countries and beyond is the starting point for their concerts. The musicians work on the melodies, improvise over them and let them sound new in their very specific tone—always with a splash of humor and self-irony.

Federspiel’s particular style is defined by the origins and backgrounds of each individual musician, including self-penned compositions with pop elements, arrangements of traditional Mexican music, and even zither as a solo instrument. Therefore, they are unable to be placed comfortably within the parameters of existing genres like “folk,” “world,” or “traditional” music. The style of the ensemble is described best by its own name: Federspiel (feather game).

Watch a video:
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Fémina (Argentina)

FederspielPatagonian rap and folk fusion trio Fémina features sisters Sofía & Clara Trucco and their best friend Clara Miglioli. Their music falls into the uniquely wonderful combination of funk, candombe, chacarera, Cuban music, flamenco, rumba, hip-hop and reggae.

It all started when the Trucco sisters left high school and the vast landscapes of Patagonia to live in Buenos Aires. Sofía was into hip-hop, while Clara was more for poetry. They merged their respective skills and performed for friends at first before moving onto performing professionally.

Not only do they combine a vast variety of musical genres, they also manage to merge delicacy and power in their voices.

Their live performances are theatrical as well as musical. The girls interpret their songs through their whole body rather than simply with their voices. "We seek to break the forms of hip-hop and create new ones, to transmit the same ideas in many distinct ways, to unite styles and genres and take from them what influences and teaches us and transform them into new music. We fuse theatrics with the power of instruments and sounds from diverse cultures to place ourselves in the epicenter of a global musical stage."

Watch a video:
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Herencia de Timbiquí (Colombia)

Herencia de TimbiquíHerencia de Timbiquí's music masterfully mixes ancestral sounds from the Afro-Colombian Pacific with elements of urban contemporary music to recreate all the power and rhythm of the chonta marimba, with guasa and bombo. They combine lyrics and melodies as mighty as the jungle, the rivers, and the Pacific Ocean that surround the town this group comes from.

These young musicians decided to create a dialogue between their empirical musical knowledge from the Colombian Pacific and the sounds of the city that embraced them when they decided to leave their village. Herencia de Timbiquí ("the Inheritance of Timbiquí") makes clear that tradition is not a museum piece but is rather enriched by merging with other elements, like the sounds of Latin music: salsa and son, but also reggae and rock, jazz and funk. After winning the official competition of the largest folk festival in Colombia, Festival de Música del Pacífico "Petronio Álvarez," the band secured a spot at the 44th Montreux Jazz Festival and later at SXSW, places where the marimba de chonta, its distinctive instrument, had never been before. In 2013 their career took off after being awarded the Gaviota de Plata at the Festival Internacional de Via del Mar, Chile, for the best folk performance with their song "Amanece."

Watch a video:
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Maya Kamaty (Réunion Island)

Maya Kamaty“Maya Kamaty is one of the best new artists to grace this site. Fans of great, female world music with French, Brazil, African, and pop qualities will love it. In fact, everyone will love this one.”
—Matthew Forss, Inside World Music

Winner of the "Music of the Indian Ocean" prize, Maya Kamaty wins hearts with her island blues melodies and halting ternary rhythm of Réunion Island maloya (a form of dance and protest music once banned by the French state). Despite being cradled by the stories told by her mother, and the music and poetry sung by her father Gilbert Pounia and his band Ziskakan, she did not take to music as her calling until she left her homeland to study in France. Distanced from Creole culture, she sought out her roots and explored her identity through music. While her music is grounded in maloya, she transcends its boundaries to create her own intimate folk style of music by blending it with French chanson, and Indian and African influences. She is also one of the few popular female singers of maloya, which is traditionally sung by males. Accompanied by traditional instruments such as kayamb and rouler, and driven by an intense passion for mixing cultures, Maya Kamaty (a name formed by combining two names, her own, and that of a woman standing marginal and intense) has the most promising voice of her generation.

Watch a video:
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Germán López (Canary Islands)

German LopezGermán López is a young timple virtuoso from Gran Canaria, the most populous of the Spanish Canary Islands. He plays the timple, a small 5-string guitar of Baroque origins and related to South American instruments like the cavaquinho, cuatro and charango. He began studying the timple at the age of five, acquiring a master’s degree in musical studies at the tender age of fifteen.

Since that time, Germán has been performing actively, including solo features with the symphony orchestra of Gran Canaria and appearances at world music festivals such as WOMAD, Circuits INJUVE, Expozaragoza, among others. He also works as a teacher, teaching music theory, piano and timple in various music schools, colleges and academies on the island.

Over the past two decades, the timple has been the focus of a revival by noted Canarian musicians who began to place it within other styles of music. Germán is carrying on the work, performing in a wide variety of musical settings, whether in duo with guitarist Antonio Toledo or Canarian singer Luis Morera or collaborating in jazz-fusion projects, or as on his recent album, De Raiz ("from the roots"), where he experiments with flamenco and global influences, flying the timple flag, weaving these multiple elements into a platform for his instrument and accomplished artistry.

Germán López blends traditional Canary Island music with a specific brand of 21st century finesse, traditional soul, and undeniable charm..

Watch a video:
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Mokoomba (Zimbabwe)

MokoombaMokoomba is one of Africa’s most exciting young bands. Mokoomba hails from Victoria Falls in Zimbabwe and they are vibrant and distinct, combining their traditional Tonga and pan-African music cultures with dashes of Rap, Ska, Soukous and Afro-Cuban music. Since winning the Music Crossroads Inter-regional Festival Competition in Malawi in 2008, Mokoomba has toured more than 40 countries in Africa, Europe, Asia and Oceania, receiving critical attention for their recordings and numerous accolades.

Mokoomba recorded its first album Kweseka-Drifting Ahead and the hit single “Messe Messe” as part of the Stand UP anti-poverty campaign funded by AfricaUnsigned in 2009. In 2011 Mokoomba and Gregor Salto released an EP titled Umvundla and in 2012 Mokoomba launched its second album Rising Tide, which has received rave reviews from world music specialists including UK’s prestigious Songlines Magazine, Froots Magazine, Afropop Worldwide and The Guardian, which listed Rising Tide in its top five world music albums of 2012.

They are also subjects of a documentary called "Mokoomba-From One River Bank To Another" by Frank Dalmat and Francis Ducat, which tells the story of Mokoomba in the context of the relationship between culture and economic development in the south.

Watch a video:
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Dona Onete (Brazil)

Dona Onete“I have the impression that everything happens at the right time. I’m not really one to rush. My life is like a river, and the current takes me. If it comes to a port, I stay for a bit, and then I just carry on my way.” And so it was that Dona Onete, a lifelong singer and composer from the Amazonian state of Pará, came to release her debut album at the wise old age of 73.

Carimbó is an indigenous rhythm and dance from Pará, the state of Belém, influenced by both African and European traditions, and which forms the basis of the more famous lambada and other Caribbean rhythms. However Dona Onete has her own take on the genre—carimbó chamegado: “I took lundum and carimbó, two of our wonderful genres, and mixed it with the rhythm of the songs from the slaves to created carimbó chamegado. It’s slower and more sensual,” she adds, with characteristic flirtatiousness. She composed throughout her career over 300 songs, but it wasn’t until she retired from her work as a history professor and the Municipal Secretary of Culture of Igaparé-Miri, that her musical career took off, and even then it was only by accident.

Ionete da Silveira Gama and her husband moved to the quiet area of Pedreira in Belém, with the intention of whiling away the rest of their days, singing as she always had done, for her own pleasure by the river, or in the occasional bar. However a local band heard her singing one day, and she claims, “thought I was a young woman, because my songs are pretty cheeky. But when they caught sight of me they were shocked to see a lady of my age!” Her age and spicy sense of humor were undoubtedly all part of the appeal for this band, who invited her to sing with them.

Believing herself to be past her prime, she initially rejected the offer, but she agreed eventually. They christened her Dona Onete, and before long she had become something of a cult figure in Belém. “Sometimes, when you think you’ve given all you’ve got, you realise that, in fact, you have a lot more ahead of you,” she stated philosophically.

She was not wrong. Since joining the band, she has performed at festivals all over Brazil and in the UK (Womad), France (Cabaret Sauvage) and Portugal (Sines) and was chosen to represent Pará for the Year of Brazil in Portugal.

Watch a video:
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Rajab Suleiman & Kithara (Zanzibar)

KitharaTanzanian instrumentalist Rajab Suleiman threw caution to the wind. He took up the vexing, beautifully rewarding qanun, a zither with dozens of strings that features prominently in music around the Mediterranean and Middle East. What followed is renewing one of Africa’s syncretic wonders, the poetically allusive, melodically lush, and rhythmically sophisticated music of Zanzibar, the Arabic classical-meets-East African taarab.

In the form’s heyday, taarab orchestras could include 60 or more musicians: violinists, singers, qanun, accordion, and oud players. During the last 20 years, synthesizers and drum machines displaced musicians. Virtuosity—and audiences—were lost.

To revive the form’s striking colors, Suleiman and a few younger players broke off from the venerable Culture Music Club in 2012 to form Kithara, a pocket orchestra capturing all the sonic specialties of acoustic taarab in an original, dynamic way. In uniting older and younger generations, Kithara’s musicians are reckoning passionately with the music’s Arabic and Ottoman underpinnings, calling out influences from Cuba to India, and welcoming Zanzibar’s ngoma folk rhythms and stories. As Peter Margasak noted in his review for Chicago Reader, Chungu, the band’s debut album released in 2014, captures this “gloriously and richly acoustic” sound with its “deft real-time interplay and magnificent singing.”

Suleiman can play striking renditions of Bach or jazz standards and has sat in with the likes of Taj Mahal, yet it’s his ingenious original pieces that are remaking taarab. The ensemble explores the subtle beauty of maqam, the system of modes and ornaments that drives Arab classical music, and pairs it with interweaving rhythms that feel distinctly African. Sensual dance rhythms unfold to startling virtuosity on instruments like the qanun and oud, violin and accordion. Earthy yet nimble vocals by local masters like Makame Faki and up-and-coming singers like Saada Nassar touch delicately on life’s most pressing, universal matters.

CenterStageThe ensemble will tour the U.S. in Fall 2016 as part of Center Stage, an exchange program of the U.S. Department of State's Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, produced by the New England Foundation for the Arts. From July-December, Center Stage will bring five ensembles from Algeria and Tanzania to the U.S. for month-long tours. Residencies will include performances, workshops, discussions, people-to-people exchanges, and community gatherings.

Watch a video:
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Vân-Ánh Võ (Vietnam)

Van-Anh VoVân-Ánh Võ devotes her life-long passion and mastery of the dan tranh zither to the creation of distinctive music blended with a cultural essence that can only come from this unique Vietnamese instrument. Among her accomplishments are the 2009 Emmy Award-winning soundtrack for the documentary “Bolinao 52,” which she co-composed and recorded, and the soundtrack for the Sundance best documentary and 2003 Academy Awards nominee “Daughter from Danang.”

Vân-Ánh Võ comes from a family of musicians and began studying đàn tranh (16-string zither) from the age of four. She graduated with distinction from the Vietnam Academy of Music, where she later taught. In 1995, Vân-Ánh won the championship title in the Vietnam National Đàn Tranh Competition, along with the first prize for best solo performance of modern folk music. In Hanoi, Vân-Ánh was an ensemble member of Vietnam National Music Theatre as well as a member of the traditional music group Đồng Nội Ensemble, which she founded and directed. She has since performed in more than fourteen countries and recorded many broadcast programs in and outside of Vietnam.

In addition to touring internationally, Vân-Ánh has presented her music at Carnegie Hall, Zellerbach Hall, Lincoln Center, Kennedy Center, and as a composer and guest artist for the Kronos Quartet at the Olympic Games 2012 Music Festival. In 2002, Vân-Ánh released her first CD, Twelve Months, Four Seasons; and in 2009, she released She’s Not She with award-winning composer Do Bao. Recently, she released her third CD, Three-Mountain Pass, with the Kronos Quartet as her guest artist.

Besides dan tranh, Vân-Ánh also performs as soloist on the monochord (bau), the 36-string hammered dulcimer (dan tam thap luc), the bamboo xylophone (dan t’rung), the k’longput, traditional drums (trong), and Chinese guzheng. She lives and teaches dan tranh and other Vietnamese traditional instruments in Fremont, California.

Watch a video:
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