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Schedule

The following artists will be performing at the National Hispanic Cultural Center for ¡Globalquerque! 2013. Performances will take place on three stages, all located at the NHCC (1701 4th St SW, at Avenida César Chávez). Enjoy the intimate courtyard setting of the Fountain Courtyard, the state of the art 692-seat Albuquerque Journal Theatre and dance outside on the Plaza Mayor.

Grounds open at 4 PM and performances start at 6:20 PM (Friday)/6 PM (Saturday) and run until at least 11:40 pm. The Global Village will be open into the night. There will also be FREE day programming on Saturday for families and adults, including workshops on music and folklore, crafts, and live performances. Visit the Global Fiesta page for more info.

2013 Globalquerque Grid Rhythm of Rajasthan Rhythm of Rajasthan DakhaBrakha Solas Leon Russell A Moving Sound A Moving Sound Kinky Sierra Leone Refugee All Stars Las Flores del Valle TO Combo Christine Salem Kardemimmit Sofia Rei Christine Salem Noura Mint Seymali Poncho Sanchez Sons of the Rio Grande Sihasin Krar Collective

 

A Moving Sound (Taiwan)

A Moving SoundSheng Dong, or as it translates in English, A Moving Sound, is a performance company based in Taipei, Taiwan. A Moving Sound has created a new musical expression that fuses Taiwanese, Chinese and neighboring Asian musical ideas in inspired and engaging modern song compositions. Songs are performed on Chinese instruments such as the vertically held and bowed erhu and the Chinese guitar known as zhongruan, as well as Western instruments. Transcendent vocals and dance by lead singer Mia Hsieh transport listeners to and beyond the Far East to where only the highest art can take us.

The modern world has turned its eyes towards the Far East with China exploding rapidly in its economy and culture. Musically, however, the world knows this region for either traditional music or music that, for the most part, copies western ideas. A Moving Sound has attracted international attention for opening a door to this unexplored territory with music that is both ethnic and intensely passionate and creative. Audiences have been thrilled to see this new musical art based on melodies and instruments from the Far East.

"A Moving Sound demonstrated their ability to transfix their audience with a mesmerizing integration of Chinese tradition and contemporary folk... Nothing short of visionary." (Tamara Turner, CD Baby)

A Moving Sound will also perform at our Friday kids's program, along with Sierra Leone's Refugee All Stars.

A Moving Sound's performances are made possible in part by a grant from the Western States Arts Federation (WESTAF) and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Watch a video:
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DakhaBrakha (Ukraine)

photoDakhaBrakha were formed at the avant garde DAKH Theatre for Contemporary Arts in Kiev and derive their name from the old Slavonic words for "give and take". They are the foremost exponents of "ethno chaos" music, which combines the elements of order and structure inherent in traditional and folk music with the chaos of free-form experimentation and improvisation. They ground their musical experimentation in the ritualistic songs of Ukraine and other Slavic neighbors and venture into a whirlwind of explosive rhythms and sounds from Asia and Africa. Their sound is at once wildly exciting and then mesmerizing and mystical, melding soulful Ukrainian folk with the jazz and trance sounds that typify World Music. This multi-instrumental band—percussion, didgeridoo, cello, accordions—have appeared in folk, rock and world music festivals around the world to rapturous applause.

"The basis of our music are songs of our ancestors some of which have pre-historic roots. In these texts and melodies lies the identification of our nation. At the same time, we dare to experiment with art, combining our ethnic style with various instruments, rhythms and melodies of other music cultures of the world giving new sound and life to the old songs."

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Kardemimmit (Finland)

picKardemimmit is a Finnish folk music group formed by four young women: Maija Pokela, Jutta Rahmel, Anna Wegelius and Leeni Wegelius. They are singers and players of the kantele (the national instrument of Finland) in its 15 and 38 stringed forms. The group's repertory consists of modern folk music mostly composed by the members themselves. The music of Kardemimmit is fresh, with foundations in Finnish tradition from both Eastern and Western regions.

The group's roots go back to the music school Juvenalia in Espoo, southern Finland, where all of the members have studied. Kardemimmit has played together for over ten years. This long history can be heard as a unique sound in both the group's singing and playing. In 2004, the Kantele Association chose the group as the kantele group of the year and the next year it won the national kantele group contest in its league.

The group's debut album Viira was released in December 2006. The second album, Kaisla, came out in 2009. Kaisla was also re-released as a bonus disc of The Rough Guide to the Music of Scandinavia in 2012 as Introducing Kardemimmit. On their third album Autio huvila, Kardemimmit continues with their original musical style combining song and the kantele. Autio huvila was released in June 2012. The album was chosen as the Folk Music Album of the Year 2012 by the Finnish Folk Music Association.

At the moment Anna and Leeni study folk music pedagogy in the Central Ostrobothnia University of Applied Sciences, whereas Maija and Jutta study in the folk music department of the Sibelius Academy. Each studies with kantele as their main instrument.

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Kinky (Mexico)

KinkyThe diverse musical and cultural scene of Monterrey, México, was the main reason why Kinky became one of the most important Latin American bands in the last decade, as well as one of the most significant bands in the rock-electronica scene. The 5-piece band is Gil Cerezo (lead vocal), Carlos Chairez (guitar), Omar Gongora (drums), Ulises Lozano (keys) and Cesar Pliego (bass).

Shortly after forming in 2000, Kinky submitted a demo to a Battle of the Bands organized by the Latin Alternative Music Conference (LAMC) in New York. British producer Chris Allison (The Beta Band, Coldplay) offered to sign and produce them under his label, Sonic 360. Their self-titled album was released in 2002 and received rave reviews from both international and national press. Huge hit songs such as “Mas,” “Soun tha mi Primer Amor” and “Ejercicio #16” led to many soundtracks and TV commercials.

In 2003, Atlas was released on Sonic 360. This album was even more focused on the electronica vibe, adding a plus for their live shows, turning them into must-see events. In 2006 the band released its third album, Reina, on their own label, Kin Kon Records. That same year, the song “Coqueta” was included on the soundtrack of the popular videogame FIFA 2006 from EA Sports, and this began the new gamer era, placing songs in Tiger Woods PGA Tour 08 and Little Big Planet. By 2008, which saw the release of their album Barracuda, Kinky had many songs being placed in TV commercials for brands such as Motorola, Smirnoff Ice, Nissan, Honda, Pontiac and Bimbo. They also managed to place songs in TV series such as "Kingpin," "Alias," 'Nip/Tuck," "CSI-NY," Fox Sports, and many more. Their latest album, Sueño de la Maquina ("Dream of the Machine"), was nominated for a Latin Grammy as best alternative music album, and the single "Negro Día" received a Latin Grammy nomination for best alternative song.

Watch a video:
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Krar Collective (Ethiopia)

KinkyKrar Collective are Temesegen Zeleke on the krar (a 5 or 6 stringed harp), singer Genet Asefa and drummer Grum Begashaw. The unstoppable trio, dubbed "the White Stripes of Ethiopia" for their minimalist rocky sound, base their repertoire on traditional Ethiopian songs, but have created a unique style with timeless appeal. Vocals are full of collective cadences and long solo poems; Genet is magnetic in performance and recording—her soaring ululations and perfectly delivered melodies fill the spacious sound. Musical stops and starts create an organic syncopation, and the krar can alternate from being lead to rhythm instrument.

The ancient 6-stringed krar lyre dates far back into Ethiopian history. An important part of the Ethiopian azmari minstrel tradition, the krar is steeped in the practice of wandering troubadours performing in cafes around the country, while legend has it that the instrument itself descends from King David’s lyre. Zeleke gives these traditions a contemporary twist and, in his hands, plugged in and strummed with hypnotic grooves, the krar becomes a gritty, ancient rock guitar. Zeleke is a revolutionary krar player and as a young student was mentored and encouraged by legendary Ethio-jazzman Mulatu Astatke.

The spellbinding rhythms of the double-headed kebero drum provide the trio’s backbeat. Traditionally used to accompany the ancient religious celebrations of the Ethiopian Orthodox church, the kebero finds a new context in the energetic grooves of Krar Collective’s performances.

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Las Flores del Valle (New Mexico, USA)

Las Flores del ValleLeila Flores-Dueñas & Carol Vigil of Las Flores del Valle (The Flowers of the Valley) have been making music together for more than 10 years at venues that range from the Gene Autry Theatre in L.A. and the National Hispanic Cultural Center to public school classrooms. Whether they are singing for huge audiences or private guests, they are sure to deliver smooth harmonies and thoughtful tunes with passion and heartfelt joy.

Carol and Leila's interests include researching and performing songs that have formed part of our rich cultural heritage in the US/Mexican Borderlands. Through various genres of music, they address social topics such as equal rights, social justice, women's history and simple hope for all age levels and across all cultures.

"Leila Flores-Dueñas and Carol Vigil seem to magically appear, two dark-haired beauties in bright silk shawls holding exotic-looking guitars, smiling and bursting into joyous dynamic song, in Spanish, English, or both, transforming wherever they play into a celebration of life... Like mystical curanderas, Las Flores del Valle weave an aura of sound, conjuring images of darkness and light, struggle, triumph, survival, love and drama. Embracing personal strength and courage with a sublime blend of harmonies, their songs transcend borders and open the heart to the hope of the possibilities of cross cultural understanding." (ABQArts)

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Sofía Rei (Argentina)

Sofia ReiSofía Rei, an Argentinean singer, songwriter, arranger and producer, is one of the most passionate, charismatic and inventive vocalists on the current New York music scene. Her music explores connections between the various traditions of South American folklore, jazz, flamenco and electronic sounds. Singing in Spanish, Sofia ties together diverse influences in a program full of rhythmic complexity, and a melodic purity that haunts even as it uplifts. She has collaborated with artists such as Maria Schneider, Bobby McFerrin, Frank London and John Zorn (currently with Mycale and the Song Project). She is also a faculty member of Berklee College of Music and NEC.

Building on the success of her Independent Music Award-winning second release Sube Azul, Sofía returns with the spellbinding De Tierra Y Oro (“of earth and gold”). She describes the album as a series of “philosophical wanderings”—songs that draw on a wide range of South American folkloric influences and bracingly modern sounds, with Rei’s powerful voice in the forefront. The textures run the gamut of contemporary to traditional: from layered and effects-treated vocals, electric guitars, loops and drum machines to Bolivian charangos, Paraguayan harps, Colombian marimbas, Argentine bombos, Peruvian cajones and more. Rei tells stories that reflect her diverse travels and experiences: a cock fight in Cartagena, a nightmare in Buenos Aires, a love letter in New York, a haunted man in the Andes. In De Tierra Y Oro we encounter Latin American myths and icons, loneliness and laughter, religious doubt, political protest, true love.

Watch a video:
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Rhythm of Rajasthan (India)

photoThe vast unending expanse of burning hot sand that makes up the Thar Desert of Rajasthan hosts one of the most vibrant and evocative music cultures of the world. The heady, spellbinding combination of rhythms and melodies sung and played by the Langas and Manganiars are part of the eternal appeal of this mysterious and wondrous land.

The Rhythm of Rajasthan (RoR) is a birth of an idea to create an exciting fusion of traditional rhythms and melodies from the state of Rajasthan. The group captures the romanticism and heroism of the north Indian desert in a visceral hypnotic performance of poetry, dance, and music. The hereditary caste musicians perform the traditional music of the Langa and Manganiar in addition to Kalbelia dance as a component in the group's colorful and stunning performance.

When the group participated in the 2nd International Sufi Music Festival in Amman, Jordan (organized by the Ministry of Culture and Jordan Music Forum), RoR's performance was so well received by the audience, that Prince El Hassan Bin Talal of Jordan honored the group in the closing ceremony of the Festival. In '09 and '11 RoR met with rave reviews on their cross-Canada and U.S. tours that included performances at the Hollywood Bowl (opening for global superstar A.R. Rahman), the Kennedy Centre (Maximum India), the 11th Chicago World Music Festival and the 5th Annual New York Gypsy Festival at the World Music Institute, and many other dynamic performances.

The Rhythms of Rajasthan have proven time and time again that their performances are exciting forays into the musical and cultural heritage of Northern India and have captivated audiences worldwide.

WESTAF NEA Rhythm of Rajasthan's performances are made possible in part by a grant from the Western States Arts Federation (WESTAF) and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Watch a video:
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Leon Russell (USA)
Leon opens the festival at 6:20 on Friday night, so come early!

Leon RussellLeon Russell has been called a rock and roll Renaissance man, and indeed there is little that this Oklahoma-bred singer-pianist hasn't done. His half-century in music stretches from his teen years in Oklahoma in the late Fifties (after Leon graduated from high school, his band, the Starlighters, went on the road with Jerry Lee Lewis) to his recent inductions into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and the Songwriter's Hall of Fame. Between his solo work, contributions to high-profile albums by other artists, and screen exposure in the "Concert for Bangladesh" and "Mad Dogs & Englishmen" documentaries, Russell became a veritable superstar in the Seventies. He's also been a notable music-business entrepreneur, having founded his own studio (Skyhill) and several labels (Shelter, Paradise and Leon Russell Records), and a prolific and celebrated songwriter.

Most of all, Leon Russell has enjoyed a remarkable and lengthy career as a performing and recording artist. His all-encompassing style ranges from raucous, gospel-inflected rock to heartfelt romantic ballads. He's also cut albums of country and bluegrass music, delved into the Great American Songbook, and recorded an album of Christmas hymns. He's recognized as one of the best interpreters of Bob Dylan and even recorded with Dylan ("Watching the River Flow") in the mid-Seventies. Over the course of five decades, Russell has proven himself to be a proudly eclectic product of America's vast musical landscape. "I like all kinds of music, and I hate to do the same thing all the time," he remarked of his far-ranging muse.

Leon opens the festival at 6:20 on Friday night, so come early!

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Christine Salem (La Réunion)

Christine SalemChristine Salem is one of the rare feminine voices of maloya with a strong and charismatic personality. Accompanied on a kayanm (her favorite instrument), Christine's voice seems to float as she sings in Creole, Malagasy, Comoran or Swahili, mixing with subtlety music from the Indian Ocean with African rhythms.

After almost 10 uninterrupted years on tour, Christine Salem felt like she needed to rest and to look into her roots. She undertook a work in a new vein, writing music based on the rhythms played during ceremonies dedicated to ancestors in Madagascar, in Comoros and in Reunion Island.

Called "Rasinaz," this project becomes reality through several initiatory journeys to the original lands and gave birth to Lanbousir, an album displaying the unusual maturity of this extraordinary singer.

"Globalfest's clear standout, Christine Salem... is from Réunion, a French island in the Indian Ocean, and she is a custodian and reinventor of music that was nearly assimilated into oblivion: a Réunion tradition with African roots called maloya, although Ms. Salem writes her own songs... Maloya is music for voices and percussion; Ms. Salem was backed by three percussionists and singers, and she played a kayamb, a rectangular rattle that was in constant motion in her hands. Often she would set out a tune, the percussionists would add harmonies and take up a polyrhythmic beat, and together they would bear down on the song until it took on a trancelike power. When Ms. Salem sang a slower tune, there was a clear, deep affinity with the blues. This was music informed by the past and fiery in the here and now." (Jon Pareles, New York Times)

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Poncho Sánchez (USA)

Poncho SanchezFor more than three decades as both a leader and a sideman, conguero Poncho Sánchez has stirred up a fiery stew of straight-ahead jazz, gritty soul music, and infectious melodies and rhythms from a variety of Latin American and South American sources.

Although born in Laredo, Texas, in 1951 to a large Mexican-American family, Sánchez grew up in a suburb of L.A., where he was raised on an unusual cross section of sounds that included straight-ahead jazz, Latin jazz and American soul. By his teen years, his musical consciousness had been solidified by the likes of John Coltrane, Miles Davis, Cal Tjader, Mongo Santamaria, Wilson Pickett and James Brown. Along the way, he taught himself to play guitar, flute, drums and timbales, but eventually settled on the congas.

At 24, after working his way around the local club scene for several years, he landed a permanent spot in Cal Tjader's band in 1975. Sánchez remained with Tjader until the bandleader's death in 1982. That same year, he signed with Concord for the release of Sonando, an album that marked the beginning of a musical partnership that has spanned more than 25 years and has yielded more than two dozen recordings.

"To me, Latin jazz is the world's greatest music," says Sánchez. "It has the melodic and harmonic sophistication of jazz and American standards, and the flavor and energy of Latin American music. What I'm most proud of is that this music—while it may sound exotic at times—is from America."

In 2012, Sánchez received a Latin Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award. He also won a Grammy in the Best Latin Album category in 2000 for his live recording Latin Soul.

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Noura Mint Seymali (Mauritania)

Noura Mint SeymaliNoura Mint Seymali, daughter of the legendary Dimi Mint Abba (hailed by Ali Farka Touré as Africa's greatest singer), represents a new generation in Mauritania. Since she began her career at the age of 13 as a precocious backing vocalist with Dimi Mint Abba, Noura has emerged in her own right as a nationally beloved star and one of Mauritania’s foremost musical emissaries. Composing for an ensemble with traditional instruments at its core—ardine (harp), tidinit (lute), and t’beul (bowl drum)— and fortified by Western bass and drum-set, Noura employs the instruments and modal structures essential to Moorish tradition while simultaneously delivering ideas within the format of the pop song.

With an already formidable debut on the international stage at events like Festival au Desert (Mali), Festival Pirineos (Spain), and Festival Timitar (Morocco), and collaborations with artists like Tinariwen, Bassekou Kouyaté, and Baaba Maal, Noura Mint Seymali is steadily gaining wider recognition, determined to bring Mauritanian music to the world. Reared in a culture of collision where sounds from across the Sahara, the Magreb, and West Africa coalesce in the dynamic language of the Moorish griot, Noura’s success stems from her ability to combine a rare classical mastery and a griot’s cultural authority with musical idioms that speak to the emergent realities of youth culture in West Africa and beyond. To an international public largely unaware of Mauritania’s unique cultural and geographic predicament—a desert nation physically and socially between North and Sub-Saharan Africa—Noura Mint Seymali will provide a sort of missing musical link between the Medinas of Fez and Algiers and the dance clubs of Bamako and Dakar, an unforgettable voice of Africa.

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Sierra Leone's Refugee All Stars (Sierra Leone)

SihasinSierra Leone's Refugee All Stars have risen like a phoenix out of the ashes of war and enflamed the passions of fans across the globe with their uplifting songs of hope, faith and joy. The band is a potent example of the redeeming power of music and the ability of the human spirit to persevere through unimaginable hardship and emerge with optimism intact. From their humble beginnings in West African refugee camps, Sierra Leone's Refugee All Stars have performed on some of the world's most prestigious stages and matured into one of Africa's top touring and recording bands.

Throughout the 1990s, the West African country of Sierra Leone was wracked with a bloody, horrifying war that forced millions to flee their homes. The musicians that would eventually form Sierra Leone's Refugee All Stars are all originally from Freetown, and they were forced to leave the capital city at various times after violent rebel attacks. Most of those that left the country made their way into neighboring Guinea, some ending up in refugee camps and others struggling to fend for themselves in the capital city of Conakry.

Ruben Koroma and his wife Grace had left Sierra Leone in 1997 and found themselves in the Kalia refugee camp near the border with Sierra Leone. When it became clear they would not be heading back to their homeland anytime soon, they joined up with guitarist Francis John Langba (a.k.a. Franco) and bassist Idrissa Bangura (a.k.a. Mallam), other musicians in the camp whom they had known before the war, to entertain their fellow refugees. After a Canadian relief agency donated two beat-up electric guitars, a single microphone and a meager sound system, Sierra Leone's Refugee All Stars were born. Eventually, the war in Sierra Leone came to an end, and over time the All Stars returned to Freetown, where they met other returning musicians who joined the band's rotating membership.

The senseless deaths and illnesses of friends and family, including some of the band's original members, and the slimming hope for great change in their country as a result of peace, has only strengthened the resolve of Sierra Leone's Refugee All Stars to do what they can to turn their country around. Their weapon in this struggle is music, and their message, while offering critique and condemnation of wrongdoing, remains positive and hopeful. Optimism in the face of obstacles, and the eternal hope for a better future motivates their lives and music.

The Refugee All Stars will also perform at our Friday kids' program, along with A Moving Sound.

Watch a video:
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Sihasin (Diné)

SihasinSihasin is a Navajo word meaning to think with hope and assurance. It also means the process of making critical affirmative action of thinking, planning, learning and becoming experienced and confident to adapt. There is no better word in the English or Navajo language that could be used to describe brother and sister Clayson and Jeneda Benally. The duo under the name Sihasin is best known as the drummer and bass player in the Indigenous punk rock band Blackfire. On their album Never Surrender, the siblings created their own unique brand of music that grew out of them protesting the environmental degradation and inhumane acts of cultural genocide against their traditional ways of life but reflects hope for equality, healthy and respectful communities and social and environmental justice.

"The kind of music that we wanted to write, that we wanted to portray is music that was hopeful and that would give empowerment, because there are so many things happening in this world that are so negative," says Janeda. "We want to, through music, remind people that they have the power to make (things) positive in their community. All it takes is one person to stand up."

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Solas (Ireland/USA)

SolasSolas is the quintessential Irish-American band recording and touring in the U.S. today. Fifteen years ago, in a manner befitting their name (Gaelic for "light"), Solas burst onto the Irish music scene and instantly became a beacon—an incandescent ensemble that found contemporary relevance in timeless traditions without ever stooping to clichés. Anchored by founding members Seamus Egan (flute, tenor banjo, mandolin, whistles, guitars, bodhran) and Winifred Horan (violins, vocals), Solas is rounded out by Mick McAuley (accordians, low whistle, concertina, vocals), Eamon McElholm (guitars, keyboards, vocals), and newest member and lead singer, Niamh Varian-Barry. Through fresh and unexpected arrangements of age-old tunes, compelling and topical originals and covers, and unparalleled musicianship, Solas continues to define the path for the Celtic music world and drive the genre forward.

With ten albums under their belt, Solas' band leader Seamus Egan was inspired by his family history to create Shamrock City—their most ambitious project to date. Shamrock City tells the story of Butte, MT, a mining town at the turn of the 20th century, as seen through the eyes of an Irish immigrant and Seamus' great-great uncle, Michael Conway. In 1910 he sailed from Cobh, Co. Cork in Ireland to Philadelphia and then made his way to Butte to work in the copper mines. Six years later, at the young age of 25, he was dead from a blow to the head. With audio recorded in Philadelphia and film footage in Butte, Shamrock City seeks to not only uncover the life and young death of Conway, but to also illuminate life as an immigrant during the Industrial Revolution.

It's no secret that Solas is often drawn to musical social commentary—"Pastures of Plenty" and "The Wind That Shakes The Barley" are core to their repertoire, and they've covered political songs by Bruce Springsteen, Tom Waits and Josh Ritter. The themes in and around Shamrock City, particularly the stories and lives of immigrants, are reflected prominently in the headlines of 2013. With the Shamrock City project and current tour, Solas seeks to reach beyond the music by creating opportunities for fans to share their family histories at tour stops and online. In the process, the project aims to create a more meaningful and open dialogue about many of the issues we face in today's America. For anyone who associates Irish music solely with pubs, green beer and March, be prepared to have your mind firmly changed.

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Sons of the Rio Grande (New Mexico, USA)

Sponsored by Western Music Association - New Mexico

Sons of the Rio GrandeThe Sons of the Rio Grande formed as a trio in 1996 from veterans of the active Western music scene in the Rio Grande valley of central New Mexico. They shared a desire to build a strong acoustic band with a lean, vocal-oriented sound. The result is a stirring combination of tight trio harmony and lively instrumental work that evokes the original Sons of the Pioneers, but builds on that excellent tradition with material spanning a century of Western music, including several original compositions from founding members Walen Mickey, Rob Croft and Larry Ruebush.

Having grown to a quartet with the addition of bassist Richard Twilley, the Sons of the Rio Grande released their eagerly awaited second album, The Westerner. Walen’s song "Stay in the Saddle" from that CD took the trophy for Best Western Song of 2010 at the New Mexico Music Awards. The title track of their debut album, Rob’s song "The Spirit & Beauty of the West," won the New Mexico Music Industry Award for Best Folk Song of 2004.

 

T.O. Combo (Tohono O'odham)

SihasinWaila, commonly known as "chicken scratch," is the popular dance music of the native peoples of the southern Arizona deserts, particularly the Tohono O'odham ("Desert People"). "Waila," from the Spanish "bailar" (to dance), sets polkas, schottisches and mazurkas to the infectious groove of accordions, saxophones, bass, guitar and drums. The origins of this social music can be traced as far back as the late 1700s and derives from contact with Spanish and American armies, trading posts, and settlers. Stylistically, waila is very similar to the norteño or "conjunto" styles of the U.S.-Mexico border areas. The difference is that waila is a strictly instrumental tradition.

Waila veterans T.O. Combo, from Sells, Arizona, are the winners of this year's Native American Music Awards in the category of Best Waila Recording ("In Loving Memory").

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